Soldier Civil War

Blacks Fought Well 7/64 Civil War Battle Tupelo Soldier Letter Slaves Slavery

Blacks Fought Well 7/64 Civil War Battle Tupelo Soldier Letter Slaves Slavery
Blacks Fought Well 7/64 Civil War Battle Tupelo Soldier Letter Slaves Slavery
Blacks Fought Well 7/64 Civil War Battle Tupelo Soldier Letter Slaves Slavery
Blacks Fought Well 7/64 Civil War Battle Tupelo Soldier Letter Slaves Slavery
Blacks Fought Well 7/64 Civil War Battle Tupelo Soldier Letter Slaves Slavery
Blacks Fought Well 7/64 Civil War Battle Tupelo Soldier Letter Slaves Slavery

Blacks Fought Well 7/64 Civil War Battle Tupelo Soldier Letter Slaves Slavery

But Probably 2 Partial Letters (See Below). 7/29/1864 Civil War 6 Page Soldier Letter. The blacks fought well as they always do.

Had slavery never existed all this blood might have been saved. Parents emigrated from Ireland circa 1840. Louis January 1841; Enlisted September 1862 as sergeant in Co. K, 33rd Missouri Volunteer Infantry. Was serving as first lieutenant in Co.

When he died December 28, 1864 from wounds received at Battle of Nashville. After the war, Surgeon Aurelius T. Bartlett of the 33rd Missouri wrote.

Lieutenant Rutledges wound though severe was not at first considered very dangerous by any except himself, but the thought that he could not survive it appeared to take possession of him and no assurances seemed to inspire a ray of hope or have any effect in relieving his despondency. I removed the bullet from his leg, resected the small bone, and left him with the other wounded, hoping that we might meet again in this life. But after a few days it was announced that his sufferings were at an endthat he had succumbed to blood poisoning.

This officer was absent from the regiment when I joined [in spring of 1863], hence my acquaintance with him was of shorter duration that with other members, but long enough for me to become strongly attached to him. He was of Irish extraction, possessed much of the wit and warm-heartedness peculiar to that nationality which made him an unusually pleasant companion.

Misfortunate seemed to attend Rutledge for prior to our acquaintance he contracted smallpox which disfigured him not a little, but he was nevertheless a fine-looking officer. Previous to enlistment he was a bookkeeper in the office of the Missouri Democrat. (scale 1-10) - 5.0 - The 6 pages are.

As often normal with a very old document tears at folds & at top of first two pages; bends, holes, holes at folds, edge wear, age discoloration; smudges, dirt, and marks. PLEASE see the photos for the most accurate, objective description of the condition. This cursive handwriting is dark ink & is pretty clear and not terribly challenging; these period letters are often difficult to read, but given a small time investment, you can get used to translating most CW letters. Translation Excepts + FULL TRANSCRIPTION BELOW. I will do the best I can below to translate, but please understand unintentional errors and/or corrected spelling & punctuation. We marched very hard and fast until the 13. When near Tupelo, a town of the R.

(railroad) where the negroes and our train were attacked. The blacks fought well as they always do and the Rebs were for the time repulsed.

We moved on steadily and our advance of Cavalry entered the town and forthwith set to work to destroy the R. Tracks and succeeded in tearing up several miles with but little trouble. We had then chosen a good position and on the 14.

On our left suddenly massed on the right held by our division but they were handsomely repulsed. And our Brigade were ordered to charge which was done with promptness and the Johnnys were driven again. Was but a repetition of the 14. Willie was wounded in the throat on the 14.

And came very near going up. He is now doing well and is, I think, out of danger. Our Regts loss was forty in killed and wounded out of 250 engaged. The total loss on our side was about five hundred against a Rebel loss of over two thousand. Little Mac The General fights poor battles and makes up for his lack in this respect by penning glowing reports of what every one else sees as failures, these he so highly colors that they read as victories even though history tells a reverse story. McClellan (I think) is either a traitor or an imbecile. The facts which to-day stare us in the face prove that peace never could be lasting while Slavery disgraced the nation. Slavery was a giant wrong and no amount of legislation could have allayed the agitation.

Slavery was not a local institution at least in its results. The people outside the slave states did have a great deal of right to meddle with the divine institution. Did it not of necessity and for its own safety exercise a dangerous censorship on the press amounting complete prohibition of any free soil sentiment. Did it not deny freedom of speech and attempt almost to hinder free thought.

What better than treason could we expect from a race of slave breeders. Sooner or later this war must have come. As well perhaps that it comes to day as in a century from now. No other remedy could have cured the nation of its leprosy. No Pro-Slavery man that is a Union man lives, it is a moral impossibility.

The Union with Slavery would not be worth a single drop of negro blood. This afternoon I received yours of the 4th inst. I have on hand just nine letters awaiting my attention which in the press of business I have been unable to notice. Your letter has precedence and the others must wait.

I had a very dull Fourth of Julythe dullest I ever spent. We were then at LaGrange 50 miles from Memphis on the Memphis and Charleston Railroad. Smith (of Red River fame) left LaGrange at the head of 13,000 men on an expedition into Mississippi for the purpose of meeting Forrest and also destroying a portion of the Mobile and Ohio Railroad. The 33rd [Missouri] accompanied him.

We marched very hard and fast until the 13th when near Tupeloa town on the railroad where the negroes and our train were attackedthe blacks fought well as they always do and the Rebs were for the time repulsed. We moved on steadily and our advance of Cavalry entered the town and forthwith set to work to destroy the railroad track and succeeded in tearing up several miles with but little trouble. We had then chosen a good position and on the 14th the enemy, after a feint on our left, suddenly massed on the right held by our division but they were handsomely repulsed and our Brigade were ordered to charge which was done with promptness and the Johnnies were driven again.

The 15th was but a repetition of the 14th. Willie was wounded in the throat on the 14th and came very near going up. He is now doing well and is I think out of danger.

He will get a furlough as soon as he can move around with ease. Our regiments loss was forty in killed and wounded out of 250 engaged. The Rebs might have been much more severely used up had it not been for the fact that our rations were exhausted and we had no communications open with our base of supplies. You have been reading McClellans report. To see the matter clearly, you should now read the review of Little Mac by the Committee on the Conduct of the War.

The General fights poor battles and makes up for his lack in this respect by penning glowing reports of what everyone else sees as his failuresthese so highly colored that they read as victories even though history tells a reverse story. Pray dont set down every man who is a first class scholar as a No. All the fine scholars in this war have made poor men for practiceGillmore, Pemberton, Fremont, &c. Compare these men with Grant or Stonewall Jackson, or Sherman, all poor scholars.

The facts which today stare us in the face prove that peace never could be lasting while slavery disgraced the Nation. Did it not necessarily and for its own safety exercise a dangerous censorship in the press amounting to complete prohibition of any free soil sentiment? Did it not deny freedom of speech and attempt almost to hinder free thought? Had slavery never existed, all this blood might have been saved.

What better than treason could we expect from a race of slave breeders? As well, perhaps, that it comes today as in a century from now. No other remedy could have cured the Nation of its leprosy.

No pro-slavery man that is a Union man lives. It is a moral impossibility. Unjust conclusions are drawn from Gov. He is the truest of the true. The Union with slavery would not be worth a single drop of Negro blood.

A center portion/pages or remainder of letter is missing? Either 2 separate partials or one incomplete letter with a set of center pages missing?

[Beginning of letter is missing; uncertain date and location]. 4th, 5th, 6th & 7th Wards. I have read the names of all the conscripts but think none now whom you are interested in. I see the name of John Anderson but hardly think it can be Our John who by the way has resigned from the Order.

Frank Parson and Charley Wientge are also out of the Lodge. My impression is that Thayer is in Vicksburg. Louis and is in government employ as watchman at Waddinghams warehouse. Louis lately in charge of prisoners.

His time must be nearly expired. Bransford is out of his situation as deputy inspector of tobacco. I think this was occasioned by the removal of Col. Willie Waters is still on duty in Overton Hospital.

He looks much better than he ever did. He is very hearty and dont look the same boy.

Sorry and family were well at last accounts. I suppose Billy is at home and out of service by this time.

Young Jim Glenn of Griggsville, who you perhaps recollect was killed while in the hundred days service. Maggie McQuiggen writes to Willie regularly.

The Lodge is getting along but slowly. Our regiment has lost more men in battle in the past year than any other regiment in the field.

I think in a few days I will be permitted to join the regiment. We have seven convalescent officers and seventy-five men in camp here. Please ask if you'd like any additional information on entries or more photos.

My goal is your satisfaction! The item "Blacks Fought Well 7/64 Civil War Battle Tupelo Soldier Letter Slaves Slavery" is in sale since Monday, March 30, 2020. This item is in the category "Collectibles\Militaria\Civil War (1861-65)\Original Period Items\Correspondence, Mail". The seller is "senft" and is located in Hanover, Pennsylvania.

This item can be shipped to United States.

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Blacks Fought Well 7/64 Civil War Battle Tupelo Soldier Letter Slaves Slavery